Fortrove News

While this pandemic is still in full swing, others within the jewelry industry are doing their best to combat everything as it comes. One such business is run by jewelry and accessory designer Lele Sadoughi. In an interview with JCK, she talks about the launch of her fashionable mask brand when COVID hit and more.

Lele Sadoughi pearl face masks

"As soon as the CDC said to grab a bandanna and put it over your face, I thought, 'I can do better than that.' Time was of the essence, and I had to find a new factory to make them," said Sadoughi about being one of the first designers to offer more luxury masks to the public. "I knew exactly what I wanted to do, which was use novelty fabrics, put embellishments on it, make it stylish. I didn’t want the folded kind because it doesn’t look as clean on the face—I did a contoured fit with adjustable straps, a soft lining, and a space to insert a filter. We didn’t even have a sample, but I had an illustrator draw it to match our seersucker headbands, put it on preorder, and sold thousands, just off the drawing. There was such a demand, and people were pleased not only with the quality and style but also with the comfort. Unfortunately, we’re still selling them."

When asked if she was bothered at all by becoming a brand that's known for designing accessories like headbands as jewelry Sadoughi said, "I see headbands as an extension of jewelry—that beaded thing on your head, your neck, your wrist, your ankle, or your ears. We’re known as an accessory company now and not just a jewelry company, which is great. As far as a new category, we’re launching decorative socks really soon in fun little packs of three. We have “country-club socks,” which are ankle length and have a little ruffle on them. We have “demi-crew” with a pill trim. People wear socks under loafers, sneakers—they’re for all occasions."

Lele x Barbie accessories

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"I believe there’s going to be an explosion for costume and fashion jewelry, which I haven’t seen since I was at J. Crew, 2008 to 2011, when people wore 10 necklaces and 17 bracelets at a time, just piled it on," said Sadoughi when asked about her thoughts on the upcoming trends in jewelry. "People are feeling less restricted by trends or rules now—there’s much more opportunity to express individuality with accessories, because no one is going to wear that headband, earrings, and sunglasses the way you do."

Information originally sourced from JCK.