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Jewelry Blog

German jewelry designer Saskia Diez is creating pieces that flow with the curvature of one's body, moving with the elegance of a dancer. In order to achieve such intricate movements with her work, she has teamed up with many artisanal jewelry crafters around Munich. Together, they create evergreen chain handbags and a slew of meticulously articulated pieces of jewelry.

Saskia Diez

When asked by Forbes about the inspiration behind her designs, Diez said, "In my work, I try to shape my ideas of empowerment, of simplicity, of sensuality, of masculine and feminine, I want to be sharp and precise, elegant and sensitive. I like making one idea visible, be it that I work on color, on a material, a manufacturing process or on a feeling like tender or bold or joy. I like focus and concentration which often leads to reduction or emphasizing. If an earring is long, it is long. If a stud is tiny, it is tiny. If a necklace is dainty, you’ll hardly see it. The transformational aspect of jewelry. Which means, I never see the piece isolated, always in communication with a person, a body, skin."

Saskia Diez

Diez had also spoken about her primary demographic for all of her work, saying that the age range for her customers is very diverse. However, her work often lands between the ages of 25 and 45. Her main market includes "a lot of creatives, actors, actresses, writers, architects, designers, stylists."

Saskia Diez

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When asked about her favorite piece in her collection, Diez said "the Big Triple earcuff. It is a great way to wear a big hoop. It looks cool as a single piece and looks especially nice when combined with other earcuffs or studs on the other ear. Also, at the moment I never go out without my MESH bag. It holds some essentials and is kind of a jewelry in itself."

Her departing words were intended as a learning experience from her time in the jewelry industry: "Stay true to yourself. Don’t let anybody talk you out of it. There are a lot of people who would give advice that might work for them but not for you."

Information originally sourced from Forbes.